7 Last Words — “Father forgive them …” (Luke 23:34)

Greg reflects on Jesus’ request that His persecutors, and our own general ignorance of our inmost selves.

“The unexamined life is not worth living.”

The Greek philosopher Socrates was said to have uttered this line as he awaited judgement at his trial. For the unaware, Socrates was accused of corrupting the minds of the youth of Athens, and sentenced to death by poison. This was due to the fact that Socrates made the “learned” men of the community appear foolish by questioning them about their beliefs and ideas. In the process, he revealed the lack of understanding they had of their own thoughts and beliefs.

In short, Socrates realized that the only person in Athens who acknowledged his own ignorance was himself. I think this implies that most, if not all of us, are ignorant. And indeed, I think the more we look into ourselves, the more we realize that we don’t know a lot, even about ourselves. I think this point about our ignorance always gets me strongly, particularly when I look at the Passion. “Then Jesus said, “Father, forgive them; for they do not know what they are doing.” (Luke 23:34).

Continue reading “7 Last Words — “Father forgive them …” (Luke 23:34)”

Silence of the Lord

Greg reflects on the movie Silence and talks about trusting in God’s promise in the silence.

“Lord, why are you silent?”

If you have watched Silence (directed by Martin Scorsese and released in 2017 in Singapore), you know of this question asked by Fr Rodriguez in his despair during his time in Japan. And I daresay this question has often been asked, though often not with these exact words.

“Why do you not answer my prayers, Lord?”

“Why can’t I hear you?”

“Why didn’t you save me from this suffering?”

Continue reading “Silence of the Lord”

Letter to St. Peter

Greg asks St Peter about the divides present in the Church

Hey St Peter!

What’s up? (If Heaven is truly above us, then you would be up I guess) Thanks for taking care of the keys of Heaven and for continually praying for us to our Father in Heaven! Thanks for letting me write a letter to you (truly very honored to be writing to the first Pope)! I must say, it is truly an honor to be writing to the first Pope of the Church and the Rock on which Jesus build His Church upon. I think it’s quite fascinating for me to be able to converse with someone who has not only walked alongside Jesus literally but have continued to spread the message of Christ to all and have ultimately, paid the price through your death (my sincerest condolences). So many questions I have in my head, so little time (or space).

Continue reading “Letter to St. Peter”

Thoughts Before a Confession

Greg writes about the feeling of futility he gets before a Confession and being unafraid to accept God’s Grace in this Sacrament.

And there I was again. Waiting outside the confessional, in line once again for my monthly reconciliation. Many things go through my head. I join the queue, rejoicing mentally when the queue is short and I don’t have to wait. Then, I look at the name of the priest outside the confessional. Sometimes, I would groan inwardly.

“Oh my gosh, this priest is NOT a good confessor.”

“Oh no, Fr _____ knows me too well!! Argh…it’ll be SOOOOO awkward”

“I hope they don’t recognise my voice”

And occasionally, “YES! Just who I was praying for!”

Continue reading “Thoughts Before a Confession”

Angels, We Have Heard from High! Now What?

Greg talks about the shepherds in the Christmas narrative: the necessary faith and openness needed to respond to the praises of the angels.

Picture the scene with me. You’re a night security officer. You’ve just come back from dinner and are intently trying not to fall asleep at your station. It’s quite late at night but you remain faithful to your job. And then, all of a sudden, a bright light begins to shine in front of you and you squint, trying to see who on Earth would switch on such a bright light at night. And lo and behold, you see this figure standing in front of you, apparently emanating this strong light that is blinding you. You are terrified. But as soon as you feel this fear, the figure says, “Do not be afraid; for see—I am bringing you good news of great joy for all the people: to you is born this day in the city of David a Savior, who is the Messiah, the Lord. This will be a sign for you: you will find a child wrapped in bands of cloth and lying in a manger.” (Luke 2:10-12). With that, more and more figures appear and they began to chant and sing, “Glory to God in the highest heaven, and on earth peace among those whom he favors!” (Luke 2:14). And this goes on and on until, slowly, one by one, the figures leave and you’re alone in your station once again. How would you react?

Continue reading “Angels, We Have Heard from High! Now What?”

Make Straight the Path

Greg ponders on what John the Baptist means when he asks us to “make straight the path” and talks about how he sometimes confuses the path for the end goal instead of simply that: a path.

A voice cries out:

“In the wilderness prepare the way of the Lord;

make straight in the desert a highway for our God.”

Isaiah 40:3

In our Advent Gospels, we always hear of John the Baptist and his mission to prepare for the coming of Jesus. And part of this call is an echo of what Isaiah has foretold and what John the Baptist reaffirms in John 1:23:

“I am the voice of one crying out in the wilderness,

‘Make straight the way of the Lord”

Continue reading “Make Straight the Path”

A letter to Greg

Greg writes a letter to himself regarding the realities of leading a church-ministry and reminds himself to enjoy the (occasionally painful) process

Hey me!

I hope all’s well and congratulations on your election as the President of Knights*! Trust me, it’s gonna be a LOOONNNGGG journey, one with many hurts but equally as many joys. And in all things, God. Now, you probably don’t believe me when I tell you that you’ll probably rely on Him A LOT and not just on your ideas (which are still amazing by the way, up top!) But just some things I wanna share about the journey (not that it’ll avoid the falls because those are important for growth) that I hope you can take to heart and to remember (albeit hindsightedly) when troubles do abound.

Continue reading “A letter to Greg”