7 Last Words — “Father forgive them …” (Luke 23:34)

Greg reflects on Jesus’ request that His persecutors, and our own general ignorance of our inmost selves.

“The unexamined life is not worth living.”

The Greek philosopher Socrates was said to have uttered this line as he awaited judgement at his trial. For the unaware, Socrates was accused of corrupting the minds of the youth of Athens, and sentenced to death by poison. This was due to the fact that Socrates made the “learned” men of the community appear foolish by questioning them about their beliefs and ideas. In the process, he revealed the lack of understanding they had of their own thoughts and beliefs.

In short, Socrates realized that the only person in Athens who acknowledged his own ignorance was himself. I think this implies that most, if not all of us, are ignorant. And indeed, I think the more we look into ourselves, the more we realize that we don’t know a lot, even about ourselves. I think this point about our ignorance always gets me strongly, particularly when I look at the Passion. “Then Jesus said, “Father, forgive them; for they do not know what they are doing.” (Luke 23:34).

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7 Last Words — Know Not.

One of my guilty pleasures is reading the rules of various Tabletop Role-Playing Games, such as Dungeons & Dragons. Just reading the rules, since I have no one to play with (although hopefully that will change soon). For me, there’s something therapeutic about seeing a world broken down into simple rules and concepts. Yes, I know I’m a nerd. A while back during a moment of procrastination, I was browsing the Character Class section of a game called Dungeon World, when a particular line in the ‘Paladin’ class section caught my attention:

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Poet Spotlight: T. S. Eliot

Garrett introduces the poet T.S. Eliot, in preparation for an upcoming article.

For my upcoming Ash Wednesday reflection for this blog, I decided to write a little meditation on T.S. Eliot’s poem Ash-Wednesday, for reasons I’m sure are not difficult to guess. However, as I prayed and prepared my points for that particular article, it struck me that Eliot was a much more complex writer than I initially realized. This made it harder to expound upon his work than I experienced with Chesterton. Whereas Chesterton’s language was relatively straightforward, Eliot’s writing twists and turns wildly, making for a much more confusing read. With this in mind, I decided to write this little piece to ‘introduce’ Eliot to you readers, and explain also why his writing can speak to a Christian, or at least, to me.

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The Discomforts of Waiting for Confession

Chris shares a reflection he had whilst queuing for the Sacrament of Reconciliation

In a few weeks’ time, parishes around Singapore will be holding the annual Lenten Reconciliation Service. This is an important time when we take-stock of our lives, recognise the areas where we have sinned and prepare ourselves for the death and resurrection of our Lord Jesus Christ. Indeed, it is a timely juncture for pause, a period for recollection and a space to redirect our inner dispositions towards Christ; it is a moment where we deeply acknowledge our failings, confess our sins and gratefully receive liberation from the Sacrament of Reconciliation. Along with the Sacrament of the Holy Eucharist, I have always found Confession to be one of the most humbling experiences of the Catholic Faith. The Sacrament of Reconciliation gives me the opportunity to tangibly partake in God’s unconditional love for me.

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